Upcoming Events

The Pragmatic Health Ethics Research Unit hosts and delivers a variety of events including, but not limited to, seminars, workshops, conferences, and guest lectures. Please explore our upcoming events below.

Seminar

Disorientation in clinical encounters

May 23rd 2019 – 12 PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Auditorium Jacques-Genest

“Disorientation in clinical encounters” by Ami Harbin (Oakland University)

Disorientations are experiences of serious disruption in response to major life events.  Following experiences of illness, trauma, grief, oppression, and education, individuals can be deeply disoriented, struggling to know how to go on.  Although disorientations can be common and powerful parts of individuals’ lives, they have remained uncharacterized by Western philosophers, and overlooked by ethicists.  My work has shown how such experiences are not only ubiquitous but also sometimes powerful in motivating moral and political action, particularly in helping individuals address oppression.  Clinical contexts, fraught as they can be with difficult decisions, loss, and uncertainty, very often trigger disorientations for patients and their families, as well as for practitioners, researchers, and policy-makers.  In this presentation, I show how understanding disorientations and their moral significance can help illuminate the emotional complexities of these contexts, and point to the potential for disorientations in clinical encounters to be not exclusively damaging, but in some cases morally productive.

Seminar

What is our responsibility with regard to the care of transgender youth?

May 9th 2019 – 12 PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Auditorium Jacques-Genest

“What is our responsibility with regard to the care of transgender youth? An exploration of recent evidence about the lived experience of gender diverse and trans children and youth in clinical care” by Annie Pullen-Sansfaçon (Université de Montréal)

Summary: Across Canada over the past 5 years, and mirroring trends in other countries, we have observed an increase in the number of referrals of young people to clinics offering gender-affirming care. Gender diverse and trans children and youth (GDTCY) are young people who do not identify with their assigned gender. To this day, little is known about the experiences of GDTCY who are receiving such care. Drawing from data about the experience of prepubertal, pubertal and postpubertal GDTCY who have been accessing specialty clinics in Canada, this lecture we will explore the GDTCY’s experiences of considering and initiating medical interventions. After presenting the obstacles they face in accessing care, their desired medical interventions and expectations regarding these interventions, their positive feelings about outcomes and their concerns and reservations, we will examine way forwards in terms of interventions as well as individual and social responsibilities to facilitate their well-being.

Seminar

La sensibilité éthique et la santé au travail: des liens à explorer

April 18th 2019 – 12 PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Auditorium Jacques-Genest

“La sensibilité éthique et la santé au travail: des liens à explorer.” Chantal Caux (Université de Montréal)

Seminar

Bien traités, mal soignés. La relation et l'information au coeur des soins.

March 14th 2019 – 12 PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Salle André-Barbeau

“Bien traités, mal soignés. La relation et l’information au coeur des soins.” Josée Blanchette (Le Devoir)

ABSTRACT: La relation et l’information au coeur des soins sont mises à mal par plusieurs facteurs, dont le manque de temps, de ressources physiques et psychologiques. Cette conférence tente de montrer les diverses embûches qui guettent à la fois les patients et les praticiens dans l’application uniforme des protocoles au détriment de la relation avec le patient. La vulgarisation et la transparence ne sont pas toujours au rendez-vous, en dépit de l’éthique en vigueur. Le consentement éclairé non plus. Les erreurs sont légion et les réponses aux questions laissent parfois à désirer. Nous sommes médicalement bien soignés, mais parfois mal traités à titre de patients. Il sera également question de l’impact sur la vie personnelle des malades (divorces, faillites, pertes d’emploi etc) lorsqu’il est question de maladies graves. Situations qui peuvent nuire à la guérison et aux traitements. En terminant, un mot sur l’acharnement thérapeutique et les rebelles qui remettent en question le pouvoir médical.

 

Seminar

Moral Entanglement and the Ethics of Closing Humanitarian Healthcare Projects

February 21st 2019 – 12 PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Salle André-Barbeau

“Moral Entanglement and the Ethics of Closing Humanitarian Healthcare Projects” by Matthew Hunt (McGill University) 

Humanitarian organizations and their staff regularly make and implement decisions to close humanitarian health projects that were initiated in situations of disaster, war or epidemic. Such decisions are frequently challenging to make, and may be contested within organizations. Indeed, they have been described as among the most ethically fraught aspects of this field of practice. In this presentation, I draw on interviews with humanitarian workers, a review of the literature, and Richardson’s concept of moral entanglements, to consider the following questions: What is ethically at stake when organizations decide to close a humanitarian project? And, how can humanitarian organizations implement ethical exit strategies? Closing projects is an inescapable aspect of humanitarian healthcare – indeed, almost all humanitarian projects will come to an end. Careful attention to obligations toward local communities and project partners during project closure is therefore a vital component of ethical humanitarian action.

 

 

Special conference

Making moral sense of stakeholder perspectives on medicines funding

January 17th 2019 – 11 AM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Salle André-Barbeau

“Making moral sense of stakeholder perspectives on medicines funding” by Dr. Wendy Lipworth (The University of Sydney)

 

Seminar

Moral Distress: Evidence and New Horizons

November 29th 2018 – 12PM @ the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (110 avenue des Pins Ouest), Auditorium Jacques-Genest 

“Moral Distress: Evidence and New Horizons” by Dr. Annie Janvier (CHU St-Justine)

Join us in person or through our YouTube channel (Pragmatic Health Ethics). The Montreal Health Ethics Seminar Series is a bilingual monthly seminar/webinar series aimed at bringing people together to think about and discuss issues in health ethics. Our aim is to promote health ethics through seminars that foster dialogue between groups of participants with different perspectives (e.g., academics, clinicians, patients, community members). These seminars will appeal to audiences both within and outside of academia and healthcare settings with the goal of increasing mutual awareness about health ethics and promote interdisciplinary and community reflections on various cross-cutting health ethics topics.

Special Event

Neurodiversity, Neuroethics, Art and Public Inquiry

October 19th 2018 – 6.30 PM @ Concordia University, Room 720, EV Building (1515 St-Catherine West) – Hosted by the Concordia Convergence Initiative

“Neurodiversity, Neuroethics, Art and Public Inquiry”

An event led by Dr. Siddharth Ramakrishnan, visiting scholar at the Pragmatic Health Ethics Research Unit (Neuroscientist and Associate Professor of Biology, Jennie M Caruthers Chair in Neuroscience at the University of Puget Sound, Washington)

With increasingly sophisticated methodologies and precise genetic approaches, neuroscience research and allied ethical questions are constantly evolving. What does neuroscience research mean in the realm of neurodiversity? What is a typical vs atypical brain?  What are the lived experiences of people with disabilities who are treated as research “subjects”?  What are the lived experiences of people with chronic illness and their idea of personhood? What are the prejudices of scientists conducting brain research and how does it affect data interpretation? Such questions are not exclusive to researchers, clinicians, and philosophers but also affect the general public. But many of these dialogues happen behind closed doors or within scientific meetings and journals. With this event, we hope to bring together scientists, artists, ethicists and other interdisciplinary thinkers to brainstorm on ideas to engage with the public and potentially develop an art exhibit to showcase the questions that emerge.

The talk will span for 20 minutes with 10 minutes of questions followed by an exciting speed dating activity. In this activity, the participants will chat one on one for 3 minutes with ethicists, artists, neuroscientists, and philosophers, all around the questions of neurodiversity, neuroethics, art, and contemporary collaborations among those disciplines.

 

Seminar

Promoting a culture of ethical sensitivity for nursing and related health and human service disciplines

October 18th 2018 – 12-1PM @ Auditorium Jacques Genest, IRCM (110 avenue des Pins Ouest)

“Promoting a culture of ethical sensitivity for nursing and related health and human service disciplines”

A talk by Kathryn Weaver (University of New Brunswick)

Ethics addresses obligations of a profession towards people who are served. Thus, ethics has a central role in the moral behaviour of nurses and related healthcare professionals toward their patients, which strongly influences patient health improvement. As far back as 2400 years ago, Socrates debated the question “Can ethics be taught?” Socrates’ position was clear: Ethics consists of knowing what one ought to do, and such knowledge can be taught. Today, healthcare ethics is a shared concern among health and human service disciplines, and the workforce of the future, largely represented by nurses, must be prepared to face complex ethical issues. The large body of literature concerning ethics in health professional education reports what ethical issues and content ought to be included in the curricula. Absent from this literature, however, is explication of the spectrum of ethical issues that occur within healthcare education settings and that contribute to moral distress.

 

Special conference

Défis et enjeux pour les professionnel-le-s confronté-e-s à des demandes de suicide assisté en établissements pour personnes âgées

September 6th 2018 – 11:00 AM – 12: 30 PM @ Salle André-Barbeau, IRCM

“Défis et enjeux pour les professionnel-le-s confronté-e-s à des demandes de suicide assisté en établissements pour personnes âgées”

A talk by Dolores Angela Castelli Dransart, PhD, Haute école de travail social Fribourg (HETS-FR), Haute Ecole Spécialisée de Suisse Occidentale (HES-SO).

Special conference

Implementing Best Practices for Informed Consent: Exploring Ethical and Practical Barriers

September 17th 2018 – 11:30 PM – 12: 30 PM @ Auditorium, IRCM

“Implementing Best Practices for Informed Consent: Exploring Ethical and Practical Barriers”

Hosted by the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal

A talk by James M. DuBois, PhD, Institute for Public Health, Washington University

Seminar Series

Uncertainty, sequencing and the practice of clinical genetics

June 13th 2018 – 11:30 PM – 12: 30 PM @ Room André Barbeau, IRCM

“Uncertainty, sequencing and the practice of clinical genetics”

A talk by Adam Hedgecoe, PhD, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, UK